Florida Amends Bar Rules to Make Pro Bono Work More Accessible for Lawyers

On November 20, 2017, the Florida Supreme Court amended Florida Rule 4-1.2 and adopted Rule 4-6.6 to make it easier for lawyers to volunteer their services to legal aid organizations and pro bono clients.

In its order, the Florida Supreme Court noted that it is not always feasible for a lawyer providing short-term limited legal services through an organization to “systematically screen for conflicts of interest as is generally required before undertaking a representation.” Newly adopted Rule 4-6.6 directly addresses that issue, and states that a lawyer who provides short-term limited legal services to a client “under the auspices of a program sponsored by a nonprofit organization, court, government agency, bar association or an American Bar Association-accredited law school” will not be held to the standard conflicts of interest rules, barring two exceptions.

Specifically, the new rule states that a lawyer providing “short-term limited legal services to a client without expectation by either the lawyer or the client that the lawyer will provide continuing representation in the matter: (1) is subject to Rules 4-1.7 and 4-1.9 (a) only if the lawyer knows that the representation of the client involves a conflict of interest; and (2) is subject to Rule 4-1.10 only if the lawyer knows that another lawyer associated with the lawyer in a law firm is disqualified by Rule 4-1.7 or Rule 4-1.9(a) with respect to the matter.”

Among the amendments to Rule 4-1.2 are additions to the language of the rule that the Supreme Court wrote will “[exempt] a lawyer who gives advice in a short-term limited legal services program under new Bar Rule 4-6.6 from the requirement that a client’s informed consent to representation limited in objectives or scope must be in writing.” The Court also wrote that the new rules are intended to encourage lawyers to volunteer their services; thereby increasing access to justice “at a time when legal aid funding and staff cannot accommodate all individuals who need legal representation.”

The Florida Supreme Court’s order on the changes went into effect on November 20, 2017. Read the full order here.

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