New York State Bar: Lawyers Offering Professional Services that are Indistinct from Legal Services Remain Subject to Rules of Professional Conduct

The New York State Bar Association (“NYSBA”) Committee on Professional Ethics has issued an advisory opinion stating that all of New York’s Rules of Professional Conduct apply to any non-legal service provided by a New York attorney when those services are indistinct from the attorney’s own legal services.

An attorney, who was also a Certified Public Accountant, inquired as to whether he could offer his accounting services to persons or entities with whom he lacked any prior personal or professional relationship. The services proposed were services that could be offered by either an accountant or a lawyer.

The advisory opinion applied the Rule 5.7(a)(1) factors to determine whether a “substantial congruence” exists between the proposed non-legal and legal services. The factors include:

  • Who the service provider is,
  • The substance of the service to be provided,
  • The proposed recipient of the service, and
  • The manner or means [by] which the lawyer offers the service.

Given that a lawyer or an accountant could offer the proposed non-legal accounting services the Committee concluded that there was a substantial congruence. The advisory opinion concluded that where a substantial congruence exists, all of New York’s Rules of Professional Conduct apply.

To read the full opinion, click here.

To Shred, or Not to Shred: That is the Question – Nebraska Permits Attorneys to Shred Physical Files

The Nebraska Supreme Court’s ethics committee has released an advisory opinion permitting attorneys to destroy physical copies of a client’s closed file so long as it is preserved in electronic form. However, the opinion advises that before a physical file may be digitized and subsequently destroyed, attorneys should consider:

  • the availability and cost of physical and electronic storage space,
  • ease of access to documents,
  • the potential need for original documents in future litigation,
  • preservation of client confidentiality, and
  • any other considerations that are pertinent to the contents of that file.

The advisory opinion was issued in response to a legal services organization’s question regarding whether digitally storing scanned images in lieu of physical storage would satisfy the Nebraska Rules of Professional Conduct, which require attorneys to preserve client files for a period of five years after termination of representation. However, the rules do not indicate whether lawyers are required to preserve those files in physical form. With the release of this opinion, the ethics committee has clarified that with the new advances in technology, it is no longer reasonable OR practical to keep physical or paper copies of every client’s files and thus allowed for the digitizing of files.

Find the full opinion here.