Is Email Encryption the New Reasonable Standard? The ABA Opines

The ever-present threat to data security  in an increasingly digitized legal profession has redefined the  “reasonable efforts” standard for lawyers who handle client information. Nicole Black over at Above the Law offers a good summary of the recently released American Bar Association (ABA)  Formal Opinion 477, which addresses a need for lawyers to increase the security  of electronic communication by using encryption in certain situations to maintain competence and client confidentiality  She also explores New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) updated  Social Media Ethics Guidelines, which acknowledge and address newer state opinions in the realm of social media.

Click on the link below to access Nicole Black’s article from Above the Law and learn more about the potential impact of ABA Formal Opinion 477 and NYSBA’s Social  Media Ethics Guidelines on the legal community.

New Guidelines: ABA On Email And NYSBA On Social Media

California Releases Final Advisory Opinion on Lawyer Blogs

Recently, the California Standing Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct finalized its opinion that analyzes whether attorney-authored blogs should be governed by the advertising regulations. The Committee concluded that blogs should be governed as attorney advertising if the blog directly or indirectly expresses the attorney’s availability for professional employment. Thus, a blog that is a part of an attorney’s professional website or a firm’s professional website is governed by the advertising guidelines.

However, the opinion distinguishes “stand-alone” blogs, which it defines as “a blog that exists independently of any website an attorney maintains or uses for professional marketing purposes.” An attorney may maintain a stand-alone blog that discusses legal topics “within or outside the authoring attorney’s area of practice.” The blog will not be subject to the advertising rules unless the blog “directly or implicitly expresses the attorney’s availability for professional employment.”

Interestingly, a stand-alone blog that discusses non-legal topics (e.g. travel and cooking) is not subject to the advertising rules, even if the blog provides a link to the lawyer’s professional website. “However, extensive and/or detailed professional identification information announcing the attorney’s availability for professional employment will itself be a communication subject to the rules and statutes.”

To access the final opinion, click here.

Attorneys v. Clients: Clients Ordered to Pay $350K for Online Defamation

As the old adage goes, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and 5 minutes to ruin it.”  Disgruntled clients are increasingly posting defamatory reviews on widely available public online attorney review websites. Some attorneys have begun fighting to protect their online reputations by filing defamation suits against their former clients.

On January 6, Florida’s Fourth District Court of Appeal held that the First Amendment does not protect demonstratively false allegations that a former client wrote about her attorney and posted online. The court determined that the comments posted on Avvo and other attorney review websites were factually inaccurate statements rather than statements of opinion. The comments included claims that the attorney misrepresented her fees and falsified a contract to support the increase in fees.  The court ordered the client and her husband to pay $350,000.00 in punitive damages for defamation

The court’s decision has been hailed as a potential turning point in the online battle among some attorneys and their clients that is damaging to attorneys’ reputations. However, it is important to note that a similar ‘client vs. lawyer’ defamation case in another state may not result in a similar award; Florida statutes allow targets of per se defamation to recover punitive damages even when the plaintiff cannot demonstrate a quantifiable loss. By contrast, there are higher evidentiary burdens in other jurisdictions that require punitive damages to be based on the amount of actual damages. Without a calculable loss, this burden would create a barrier to achieving a similar result.

To read the trial court’s opinion, click here.

New Social Media Opinions: West Virginia and Colorado

Recently, two more states, West Virginia and Colorado, joined the legal ethics conversation regarding social media, issuing opinions that are generally consistent with most other states’ social media opinions.

In September 2015, the Lawyer Disciplinary Board of West Virginia issued new social media and social networking guidelines titled “Social Media and Attorneys.” Specifically, the Board addressed the following topics: attorney competency, taking down posts, avoiding contact with represented persons, contacting unrepresented persons, monitoring third-party reviews and endorsements, protecting confidentiality, honesty in endorsing other lawyers, researching jurors, friending judges, and avoiding inadvertent lawyer-client relationships. The Board concluded in part that attorneys may not make statements on social media that the attorney knows or reasonably knows will be disseminated publicly and will have “a substantial likelihood of materially prejudicing an adjudicative proceeding,” subject to certain exceptions listed in the rule on trial publicity. Additionally, the Board opined that attorneys may accept client reviews but must monitor the reviews for accuracy. Regarding advising clients on their social media presence, the Board concluded that attorneys may advice their clients to change the privacy settings of their social media pages, but attorneys may not instruct their clients to “destroy, alter, or conceal any relevant content on their social media pages.” Instead, attorneys must take the appropriate steps to preserve the information in the event that it is discoverable or relevant to the clients’ cases.

Also in September 2015, the Colorado Bar Association Ethics Committee issued its opinion titled “Use of Social Media for Investigative Purposes.” The Committee concluded that investigation of public profiles and posts is always permitted. Limits apply, however, when permission is requested to view restricted or private content. The opinion addresses ethical issues that arise when lawyers, either directly or indirectly, use social media to obtain information regarding witnesses, jurors, opposing parties, opposing counsel, and judges.

Both West Virginia and Colorado came to the following conclusions, among others: Regarding attorneys reviewing jurors’ Internet presence, attorneys may review public sections of a juror’s social networking presence, but may not attempt to access private sections of a juror’s social media page or use the assistance of a third party to do so. Moreover, attorneys may not seek to communicate ex parte with a judge through social media concerning a matter or issue pending before the judge. The Colorado opinion further states that attorneys may not request permission to view restricted portions of a judge’s social media profile while the judge is presiding over a case in which the lawyer is involved as counsel or as a party.

In a nutshell, both opinions conclude that lawyers must comply with the ethics rules when using social media just as when using other forms of communication.

To read the full West Virginia opinion, click here. To read the full Colorado opinion, click here.

Is Your LinkedIn Profile Attorney Advertising?

Does an attorney’s LinkedIn profile necessarily constitute attorney advertising?

In analyzing whether a LinkedIn profile is advertising, The Association of the Bar of the City of New York Committee on Professional Ethics Formal Opinion 2015-7 (“Opinion”) applied the New York Rules of Professional Conduct’s definition of an advertisement, which is “any public or private communication made by or on behalf of a lawyer or law firm about that lawyer or law firm’s services, the primary purpose of which is for the retention of the lawyer or law firm.”

The Committee concluded that if the primary purpose of an attorney’s LinkedIn profile is not to attract new clients, it is not advertising. So, how does an attorney define primary purpose? The Opinion explains that if the following criteria are met then a LinkedIn profile is advertising:

  1. It is communication made by or on behalf of the lawyer;
  2. The primary purpose of the LinkedIn content is to attract new clients to retain the lawyer for pecuniary gain;
  3. The LinkedIn content relates to the legal services offered by the lawyer;
  4. The LinkedIn content is intended to be viewed by potential new clients; and
  5. The LinkedIn content does not fall within any recognized exception to the definition of attorney advertising

The Opinion’s elaboration on each of the criteria may be found here.

So what do you do if your LinkedIn profile is considered an advertisement?

The Committee noted that a LinkedIn profile that constitutes advertising must comply with all of New York’s attorney advertising rules, including, but not limited to, the inclusion of the label “Attorney Advertising” legibly placed on the profile along with the name, principal law office address, and telephone number of the attorney. Additionally, the advertisement must not be deceptive or misleading.

The Committee also cautioned attorneys to personally “pre-approve” their advertisements, and reminded them that LinkedIn is considered to be a “computer-accessed communication” and thus must be retained for at least one year in accordance with New York’s attorney advertising rules.

The Opinion is novel in that it is the first ethics advisory opinion to conclude that all attorney LinkedIn webpages (or other social media profiles) are not necessarily advertisements. It will be interesting to see whether other bar associations and state bars follow New York City’s lead.