Facebook “Friends” Aren’t Necessarily Real Friends

Florida’s Third District Court of Appeal has decided that a Facebook friendship doesn’t necessarily signify a close relationship warranting automatic disqualification of a judge. The decision allows Miami-Dade Judge Beatrice Butchko to remain on a case in which she is a Facebook “friend” with a lawyer representing a potential witness and potential party in the pending litigation.

In the decision, the court notes its disagreement with another Florida appeals court. In a 2012 decision, the Fifth District Court of Appeal held that a judge had to disqualify himself because he was Facebook friends with the prosecutor.

In its decision, the Third District Court of Appeal emphasized that “some of a member’s Facebook ‘friends’ are undoubtedly friends in the classic sense” and that a relationship between a judge and a lawyer may, under certain circumstances, warrant disqualification. But, the court noted, “[a]n assumption that all Facebook ‘friends’ rise to the level of a close relationship that warrants disqualification simply does not reflect the current nature of this type of electronic social networking.”

Read the full opinion here.

Nebraska Lawyers Get the Green Light to Accept Bitcoin

In a recent ethics advisory opinion, the Nebraska Supreme Court Advisory Committee declared that attorneys may accept digital currencies such as Bitcoin as payment for legal services, but must immediately convert the currency into U.S. dollars. The opinion is the first by a state ethics body to consider how the ethics rules apply to lawyers accepting this controversial form of currency.

The fluctuating exchange rate of digital currency implicates ethics rules related to the reasonableness of attorney’s fees. The value of Bitcoin, for example, fluctuates as much as ten percent per day. This volatility in value presents the potential for overpayment for legal services.

To combat this risk, the opinion outlines three steps attorney’s must take when accepting payment in digital currencies: (1) notify the client that the payment will be immediately converted to U.S. dollars, (2) make the conversion through a payment processor, and (3) credit the client’s account at the time of payment. The opinion further advises attorney’s to be “careful to see that [digital currency] is not contraband, does not reveal client secrets, and is not used in a money-laundering or tax avoidance scheme; because convertible virtual currencies can be associated with such mischief.”

Read the full opinion here.

To Shred, or Not to Shred: That is the Question – Nebraska Permits Attorneys to Shred Physical Files

The Nebraska Supreme Court’s ethics committee has released an advisory opinion permitting attorneys to destroy physical copies of a client’s closed file so long as it is preserved in electronic form. However, the opinion advises that before a physical file may be digitized and subsequently destroyed, attorneys should consider:

  • the availability and cost of physical and electronic storage space,
  • ease of access to documents,
  • the potential need for original documents in future litigation,
  • preservation of client confidentiality, and
  • any other considerations that are pertinent to the contents of that file.

The advisory opinion was issued in response to a legal services organization’s question regarding whether digitally storing scanned images in lieu of physical storage would satisfy the Nebraska Rules of Professional Conduct, which require attorneys to preserve client files for a period of five years after termination of representation. However, the rules do not indicate whether lawyers are required to preserve those files in physical form. With the release of this opinion, the ethics committee has clarified that with the new advances in technology, it is no longer reasonable OR practical to keep physical or paper copies of every client’s files and thus allowed for the digitizing of files.

Find the full opinion here.

New York City Bar: Is A Client’s Confidential Information Secure at the Border?

Attorney’s traveling across the U.S. border may have to account for more than just their luggage. In fact, the New York City Bar recently issued Formal Opinion 2017-5, which offers guidance on dealing with the threat of disclosing confidential client information during a border search of electronic devices.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) policy allows U.S. customs agents to review electronic information that is physically stored on a traveler’s device. However, an attorney has an affirmative duty to take “reasonable steps” to avoid disclosing confidential information not authorized by a client.

The New York City Bar’s opinion emphasizes  that under New York’s Rule 1.6(b)(6), attorney’s may not  reveal confidential client information unless it is “reasonably necessary” to obey a “law or court order.” But what determines whether disclosure is reasonably necessary? The opinion states that disclosure of clients’ confidential information is not reasonably necessary if there are “reasonable, lawful alternatives to disclosure.”

For example, an attorney may explain to an inquiring border agent that the device contains client confidential information and request that the materials not be subject to the search. An attorney may also ask to talk to a supervisor and should be prepared to produce state bar identification.  If it becomes necessary for an attorney to disclose clients’ confidential information to the border patrol, then the client must thereafter be informed about the disclosure under New York’s Rule 1.4.

Generally, attorneys should consider the risks of carrying clients’ confidential information while traveling, avoid transporting confidential information when possible, and evaluate what safeguards are reasonable to protect confidential information in the event that it is necessary to carry the information out of the country.

To read the full opinion click here.

Is Email Encryption the New Reasonable Standard? The ABA Opines

The ever-present threat to data security  in an increasingly digitized legal profession has redefined the  “reasonable efforts” standard for lawyers who handle client information. Nicole Black over at Above the Law offers a good summary of the recently released American Bar Association (ABA)  Formal Opinion 477, which addresses a need for lawyers to increase the security  of electronic communication by using encryption in certain situations to maintain competence and client confidentiality  She also explores New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) updated  Social Media Ethics Guidelines, which acknowledge and address newer state opinions in the realm of social media.

Click on the link below to access Nicole Black’s article from Above the Law and learn more about the potential impact of ABA Formal Opinion 477 and NYSBA’s Social  Media Ethics Guidelines on the legal community.

New Guidelines: ABA On Email And NYSBA On Social Media