Colorado Goes Live with Lawyer Self-Assessment Program

On October 24, 2017, the Colorado Supreme Court launched an online platform aimed at helping Colorado lawyers to practice ethically, avoid disciplinary actions, and reduce stress when dealing with rules of professional conduct. The new Colorado Lawyer Self-Assessment Program is the first online self-assessment program launched by a state for its lawyers, but Illinois will soon follow with its own similar same initiative.

A subcommittee of the Colorado Supreme Court’s Advisory Committee initiated the self-assessment tool, and a group of Colorado lawyers, professionals, and professors assisted in its development. The self-assessment program addresses 10 important areas-including conflicts, confidentiality, and fees-in which lawyers encounter common ethical obstacles when practicing law. Every area contains a list of objectives, requirements, and the best practices to follow. Then, the program asks the lawyer performing the assessment if he or she is following those guidelines and, if the answer is negative, the program provides ethics opinions and articles that explain the risks involved. Lawyers who complete the entire program also receive CLE credit.

Colorado lawyers are responding positively to the self-assessment program and the Colorado Supreme Court’s Advisory Committee expects to improve it considerably based on the assessment reports submitted.

View the Colorado Lawyer Self-Assessment Program here.

Bloomberg Law Trains Machine to Highlight Legal Points

On September 26, 2017, Bloomberg Law unveiled an AI program called “Points of Law,” a service that allows users to quickly identify and analyze language in a judicial opinion. The program uses a machine learning algorithm that indexes its opinions, making it easier for users to find legal points and precedents that strengthen their own legal arguments. When the feature is turned on, language is highlighted in the text, and citations are linked from the margin. The program is one of a wave of automated legal research and analysis engines that are raising significant ethical questions regarding attorney competence and confidentiality.

As reported by the ABA, attorneys are increasingly turning to AI-generated work product to increase their legal research and drafting efficiency. In fact, attorneys participate in training these machine learning algorithms, as each query entered into the system helps to expand and refine the legal analysis the algorithm returns. But, when delegating work to AI programs, attorneys should be wary of their ethical obligations under the competence rules. Significantly, lawyers must understand how AI programs function in order to fulfill their duty of technological competence.

This means that a lawyer using Bloomberg’s Points of Law service must understand how the program’s indexing works and how it selects which language to highlight. For example, though AI programs continuously “learn,” they may not find every supporting precedent for a client’s case. As such, a lawyer entering a query into programs like Points of Law must ensure the accuracy of the research returned in order to satisfy their duty under the ethical rules. AI programs likely pose concerns regarding lawyers ethical duties of confidentiality. Therefore, lawyers must take the appropriate steps to prevent inadvertent disclosure of confidential information by completely understanding the terms of service of the AI programs they are using, and ensuring there is a confidentiality agreement with the AI vendor.

Find the article discussing the unveiling of Bloomberg’s Points of Law here.

In the Cloud? The Florida Bar Publishes Guidelines for Selecting a Cloud Service Provider

In the Cloud? The Florida Bar Publishes Guidelines for Selecting a Cloud Service Provider

The Florida Bar’s Technology Committee in collaboration with The Florida Bar’s Practice Resource Institute have published both a quick start guide to cloud computing and  more comprehensive due diligence guidelines to assist lawyers in selecting a cloud service provider.

The Florida Bar News reports:

“Two things are happening more than ever right now: Lawyers are using the cloud to store sensitive information; and lawyers are under attack from cyber criminals looking to steal sensitive information,” said Tech Committee Chair Al Saikali, who also chairs the Privacy and Data Security Practice area at Shook, Hardy & Bacon. “It was therefore important to develop a document that teaches lawyers about the cybersecurity and legal issues associated with the storage of cloud service providers.”

To read the article that contains links to the new guidelines click here

Storing Client Data in the Cloud is Ethical, With Safeguards

On September 11, 2015, the Tennessee Supreme Court Board of Professional Responsibility confirmed in Formal Opinion 2015-F-159 that a lawyer may ethically allow client confidential information to be stored in “the cloud.” In doing so, the lawyer must take reasonable care to ensure that client materials remain safe and confidential.

“The cloud” is a remote location controlled by a third party that provides storage or other computing services. Rather than having information stored on a server or personal computer, access to cloud computing technology allows lawyers to transmit, process, and manage their client’s data from a remote location. One benefit of cloud computing technology is that the cloud service provider takes on the responsibility for new technology and software updates.

Because technology is constantly changing, lawyers must stay abreast of these changes and ensure that they continue to comply with the rules of professional conduct. It must be noted that this opinion does not mandate any specific practices that a lawyer must follow when using cloud computing technology. Rather, the opinion provides guidance to lawyers on how to exercise judgment when using cloud technology in order to remain compliant with the rules of professional conduct. For example, when using cloud computing technology a lawyer must abide by several Rules: Rule 1.1, which requires a lawyer to act competently; Rule 1.6, which requires a lawyer to take practical measures to protect the confidentiality and security of the client information stored in the cloud technology; and Rule 1.9, which states that a lawyer has a duty to former clients to not reveal any client information relating to the representation except as the Rules permit or require with respect to the client.

This recent opinion follows several other states that have provided commentary on cloud technology and what lawyers in those jurisdictions should consider. The opinion provides commentary on the subject by different states, including Florida, Kentucky, and Alaska.

Although cloud-based services are available for use by lawyers, reasonable care must be exercised when storing client information in the cloud to ensure that it is stored safely. If the client’s information is at risk, this cloud could rain on the lawyer’s head!

To read our other posts on cloud computing click here.

Avvo Advisor®: A Game-Changer

On October 23, 2014, Avvo Inc., the leading online legal marketplace, launched Avvo Advisor, a service that provides fast, on-demand legal advice by phone for a fixed rate of $39.00 for a 15-minute conversation with an attorney.  This service is available either online at avvo.com/advisor or through a free Avvo Advisor iOS app and covers nine areas of law (and counting), including bankruptcy, criminal, divorce, employment, family, immigration, landlord-tenant, real estate and small business. Avvo Advisor is pushing the envelope by making professional legal assistance more accessible, affordable, and less time-consuming and hassle-ridden. The legal ethical implications of this limited scope service have yet to be fully explored, but it raises issues as to how to implement a viable conflicts check and whether legal services on demand will alter the traditional view of the attorney-client relationship.

As Mark Britton, Avvo’s founder and CEO, remarked, “we want to make access to legal help as routine as getting a medical checkup, and Avvo Advisor is a game-changing step towards that goal.”

Click here and here to read more.